The Cause of Earth’s Magenetic Field

Date: October 17, 2017
Time: 11:00 am

Location: Planetary Hall Room 242

Featured Speaker:
John Shebalin
George Mason University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Weather Lab

Abstract:
The Earth’s quasi-steady dipole magnetic field may be due to magnetohydrodynamic turbulence within the outer core. Here, the theoretical and computational results that lead to this hypothesis will be discussed, and new numerical results will be presented.

The New Horizons Mission to Pluto: A Recap of Science Results, and a Look Forward to the Encounter with 2014MU69

Date: October 13, 2017
Time: 3:00 pm

Location: Planetary Hall Room 126

Featured Speaker:
Michael Summers
George Mason University, Department of Physics & Astronomy

Abstract:
The New Horizons spacecraft made its closest approach to the Pluto/Charon double planet system on July 14, 2015. The observations, and especially the images of Pluto and Charon returned by the spacecraft were astonishing, and provided many surprises. Those …

Seeing Double: Scientists Find Elusive Giant Black Hole Pairs

This graphic shows two of five new pairs of supermassive black holes recently identified by astronomers using a combination of data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Wide-Field Infrared Sky Explorer Survey (WISE), and the ground-based Large Binocular Telescope in Arizona. This discovery could help astronomers better understand how giant black holes grow and how they may produce …

Colloquium: Optimal Control of Networks: Energy Scaling and Open Challenges

Date: October 6, 2017
Time: 3:00 pm

Location: Planetary Hall Room 126

Featured Speaker:
Francesco Sorrentino
University of New Mexico, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Abstract:
Recent years have witnessed increased interest from the scientific community regarding the control of complex dynamical networks. Some common types of networks examined throughout the literature are power grids, communication networks, gene regulatory networks, neuronal systems, food webs, and social systems. …

Colloquium: The Dynamo Problem, or: Where does the Earth’s Magnetic Field Come From?

Date: September 29, 2017
Time: 3:00 pm

Location: Planetary Hall Room 126

Featured Speaker:
John Shebalin
Space Weather Lab, GMU

Abstract:
The origin of the Earth’s magnetic field has been a puzzle for millennia, and only in the last hundred years has an answer emerged, one that is still being refined. When it was realized that the geomagnetic field had to be produced dynamically within a …

Colloquium: Apollonian Fractal — Numbers, Geometry, and Physics

Date: September 22, 2017
Time: 3:00 pm

Location: Planetary Hall Room 126

Featured Speaker:
Jerzy Kocik
Southern Illinois University, Department of Mathematics

Abstract:
Not only is the Apollonian configuration of circles an aesthetically noteworthy fractal but it also possesses a surprisingly rich mathematical structure. In particular, it conceals the main ingredients of modern physics, like Minkowski space-time, a model of spin, analogies of the quantum Aharonov-Bohm-like …

Colloquium: Mathematics and Climate

Date: September 8, 2017
Time: 3:00 pm

Location: Planetary Hall Room 126

Featured Speaker:
Hans G. Kaper
Georgetown University and Mathematics and Climate Research Network

Abstract:
Mathematical models and statistical arguments play a central role in the assessment of the changes that are observed in Earth’s climate system. While much of the discussion of climate change is focused on large-scale computational models, the theory of dynamical …

Twitter Q&A with Dr. Geller on the solar eclipse

Tuesday, August 15, Twitter Q&A with Associate Professor & Observatory Director, Dr. Harold Geller. Follow @GeorgeMasonNews on Twitter for the Q&A starting at 12pm!

Our #solareclipse17 Q&A is Aug. 15 at 12p! Tweet questions to @GeorgeMasonNews using #VaEclipse or send them in advance to jroger20@gmu.edu pic.twitter.com/7c27QjyhzH

— George Mason News (@GeorgeMasonNews) August 14, 2017

Peter Plavchan

Assistant Professor


Primary Research: Astrophysics/Exoplanets

Anne Crowell

Adjunct Faculty